Better Badminton

By RobertRyles

The sport of badminton is one that has roots heavily planted in history, as an early form of the game existed with the ancient Greeks and Egyptians. During fifth century China, a variation of the sport involved the kicking of a shuttle, until the 1600s saw the racket replace the foot.

he sport as it is now played is believed to have come from a game called battledore and shuttlecock, where two players batted a feathered shuttlecock back and forth with the help of a minuscule set of rackets.

The game known as "Poona" in India travelled to England during the 1860s when British Army officers stationed in the country took an interest in the sport. A newer version
of the game suited for the English made an appearance in 1873 at Badminton House, an establishment owned by the Duke of Beaufort. At that time, the activity was referred to as "The Game of Badminton," until a shortened version of the name ("Badminton") became the official label.

Over the years, the English still played under the rules of India until 1887 when a standardized set of regulations were shaped at the Bath Badminton Club. In 1893, the first set of guidelines were published, followed by the first official competition in 1899.

The coming years brought a wealth of changes for the sport, including the 1901 switch in indoor and outdoor play and hourglass-shaped courts becoming rectangular.

Badminton Skills and Attributes

Regardless if one participates in a spirited game of badminton arranged in the backyard or seriously trains for Olympic competition, high levels of play demands a reasonable level of fitness that includes aerobic stamina and speed as well as good hand-eye coordination and polished racket skills.

Perfection of different shots, footwork skill and improved reaction time are key attributes to work on.

Improving the Game

One of the best ways to improve an overall badminton game is to engage in half-court singles, using only half of the space of a standard singles court. Participants should follow normal play with scoring to 15.

A keener sense of anticipation and concentration enhances defensive awareness. The art of deception also comes into play in badminton, as body momentum and timing can be the difference between a victorious and unsuccessful rally.

Learning how to place the feet and body into the correct position where the best follow-through can be accomplished is vital.

There are of course the many benefits that come from developing such mental and physical strategies as, for example, a positive attitude and overall body condition.

About the Author

Rob is a successful International Chartered Physical Therapist. He has been a lecturer, researcher and therapist for over two decades. His rich experience of International and Premiership Football underpins his specialist knowledge of orthopedics, sports medicine and rehabilitation. There is a wealth of insight and information on rehabilitation, injury and successful recovery on his website at http://www.the-rehabilitation-room.com

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